Commonality of Thought

Although we each believe our thoughts are specific and personal to ourselves, in fact, our thoughts, fears, and desires are normal to all egos and are commonly shared. In this way, it is relatively easy to read the thoughts of most humans with just a few subtle cues. Thoughts tend to run along the same worn tracks leading to the same worn conclusions. Combining this knowledge with an understanding of the types of thoughts that individuals at different levels of consciousness will gravitate towards will, with experience, lead to becoming a most astute mind reader. Continue reading “Commonality of Thought”

Pittown: Repeat or Delete

Chapter 15: The Audition

As the students were on holiday, Ben took the rare opportunity of sitting alone in Tom & Hardy to look through the recently published, Eighty Years of The State Ballet.

“You in that?” asked Tom.

“Yep,” said Ben pointing to one of the later pages in the book.

“Impressive,” said Tom. Ben didn’t reply. “Can I have a look?” asked Tom pointing to the book. He opened it and searched the first few pages. “Found it,” he said. “That’s my grandfather there. He was one of the corps de ballet in the early days. He wasn’t really a ballet dancer. He was a self-taught ice skater but, back then, the company was desperate for male dancers so they took him.” Continue reading “Pittown: Repeat or Delete”

Pittown: Dirty Dancing

Chapter 13: Dirty Work

Merlyn could hear the cafe music as she approached a distinctive blue door on which the words Tom & Hardy had been freshly painted.

I’m a fool to do your dirty work
Oh yeah
I don’t wanna do your dirty work
No more
I’m a fool to do your dirty work
Oh yeah

“Hi Merlyn,” said Tom. “Glad you came to see my new place. Take a seat anywhere.” Continue reading “Pittown: Dirty Dancing”

Pittown: Love of Life

Chapter 11: Names

Pittstop, the cafe near Merlyn, had been in the same family since it was a country stop for truckies, thus its name. Sometimes, one of the owner’s cousins worked in the cafe. They were nothing alike. Months ago, the cousin, Tom, decided that Merlyn should know his name.

The next time he saw her, he asked, “Can you remember my name?”

Merlyn usually didn’t remember names well. She remembered people’s energy exceptionally well.

“Yes,” she said hesitantly.

“What is it?” asked Tom unapologetically.

He wants me to know who he is, thought Merlyn. He must want to be friends. Continue reading “Pittown: Love of Life”