Pittown – Silent Order: Joe-Joe’s Apartments

Continuing from Pittown (Part 1)here is the first part of Silent Order (Part 2).
The silence is constant. The noise is temporary.

Chapter 18: The Dream and Dr. Apollo

A few months ago, when Edgars Lake had resigned itself to winter and the six cygnets had grown and flown, Merlyn had a lucid dream. It was as real as reality, at least, until normal life had a chance to claim the day. In the dream, Merlyn lived in a female hermitage. The inhabitants wore long gowns, although, clothes were neither here nor there because everyone was translucent and shining. Whatever needed communicating was done telepathically. Strange as it sounds, Merlyn spent nearly all her time in one room. Seven years passed in this way. One would assume that one would get very bored being stuck in a room with nothing to do for seven years. Yet, that was far from the case. It was exquisitely beautiful, but not in a way that can be explained in words. At the end of the dream, Merlyn was told that although there were no similar places on Earth, there were many watered-down versions taking numerous forms. The dream was not, could not be, forgotten. Continue reading “Pittown – Silent Order: Joe-Joe’s Apartments”

Pittown: Repeat or Delete

Chapter 15: The Audition

As the students were on holiday, Ben took the rare opportunity of sitting alone in Tom & Hardy to look through the recently published, Eighty Years of The State Ballet.

“You in that?” asked Tom.

“Yep,” said Ben pointing to one of the later pages in the book.

“Impressive,” said Tom. Ben didn’t reply. “Can I have a look?” asked Tom pointing to the book. He opened it and searched the first few pages. “Found it,” he said. “That’s my grandfather there. He was one of the corps de ballet in the early days. He wasn’t really a ballet dancer. He was a self-taught ice skater but, back then, the company was desperate for male dancers so they took him.” Continue reading “Pittown: Repeat or Delete”

Pittown: Dirty Dancing

Chapter 13: Dirty Work

Merlyn could hear the cafe music as she approached a distinctive blue door on which the words Tom & Hardy had been freshly painted.

I’m a fool to do your dirty work
Oh yeah
I don’t wanna do your dirty work
No more
I’m a fool to do your dirty work
Oh yeah

“Hi Merlyn,” said Tom. “Glad you came to see my new place. Take a seat anywhere.” Continue reading “Pittown: Dirty Dancing”

Pittown: Love of Life

Chapter 11: Names

Pittstop, the cafe near Merlyn, had been in the same family since it was a country stop for truckies, thus its name. Sometimes, one of the owner’s cousins worked in the cafe. They were nothing alike. Months ago, the cousin, Tom, decided that Merlyn should know his name.

The next time he saw her, he asked, “Can you remember my name?”

Merlyn usually didn’t remember names well. She remembered people’s energy exceptionally well.

“Yes,” she said hesitantly.

“What is it?” asked Tom unapologetically.

He wants me to know who he is, thought Merlyn. He must want to be friends. Continue reading “Pittown: Love of Life”

Pittown: Moving On

Before anyone can improve their life, they must get the idea that change is possible, that life can be different and better, and that it is worth the effort it takes to make it happen.

Chapter 8: Different and Better

Although there were nicer shops a suburb or two closer to the city, Merlyn made a point of shopping at the Pittown ones. It seemed to her disloyal not to use them. Besides, she found the people interesting. Not infrequently, someone walked past her and turned their head to give her a second look. They looked like they thought they knew her but then decided that they didn’t. Sometimes, they looked at her quizzically as if they were thinking that she didn’t belong in Pittown. Continue reading “Pittown: Moving On”

Pittown: Firsts and Seconds

Chapter 7: Edgars Lake

Edgar was not only named after the famous clairvoyant, Edgar Cayce, but he was also named after his great grandfather, Edgar I, who lived in Pittown all his life. Those days, Pittown was an agricultural area. Later, it became a residential and industrial area. Edgar I built a concrete weir and dammed the creek running through his property creating a lake for wildlife. He bequeathed that part of his property to the people of Pittown. It was aptly named Edgars Lake. It was the lake at the bottom of Merlyn’s street. Continue reading “Pittown: Firsts and Seconds”

Faith: Husband

When the ocean comes to you as a lover, marry, at once, quickly, for God’s sake. Don’t postpone it. Existence has no better gift. Rumi

Desperation is the door of the Divine.

Chapter 21: Zen Den

In Wurt Wurt Koort:
“I need a bigger space for my Mystery School,” said Aunt Charity as she showed Bethany the room she had set up in the back of Rybert’s tearooms.

Bethany passed her hand over the bewitching glass ball which had pride of place in the middle of the round table. How similar it looks to Nina’s, she thought. It even has the same red velvet underneath and the same mysterious lights darting around inside.

“It’s one of a pair,” said Aunt Charity. “The sister crystal ball went to a woman I met in a country shop sixty-five years ago. The shop was called Zen Den.”

Nina is Charity’s age, thought Bethany. “Where did the other woman come from?” Continue reading “Faith: Husband”

Faith: Tears and Sunshine

Here is the next part of Faith (Book 4 of the Waldmeer Series).

“I feel the love, I feel the love, I feel the love that’s really real.” (Walking on Sunshine)

Chapter 18: A Thousand Years of Tears

In the Borderfirma Mountains:
Aristotle hung his legs from the top of the three-storey tree house in the palace gardens. It wasn’t the same without Malik. Tree houses are meant for sharing; sharing adventures and secrets. The last time Aristotle was in this tree house was half a year ago but in those months, many years had passed in the Borderfirma Mountains. Malik had long since outgrown the days of playing in trees. Continue reading “Faith: Tears and Sunshine”

Faith: Keep Going

“Everyone who has come to Earth,” he said, “has chosen the ego and must learn, quickly or slowly, its worthlessness and its venom.”

Chapter 16: Move

Michael, the shy sixteen-year-old boy that Malik was training, stood in the cafe line. A group of similar-aged boys came in. Michael averted his eyes and hunched his shoulders as if he was trying to hide inside himself.

“Move back, idiot,” said one of the boys. “We’re ahead of you.”

Michael was about to give his place to them when he noticed Malik sitting at a nearby table. Malik was watching intently. Michael didn’t know what to do. If he didn’t move, the boys would get angry. If he did move, he would have to face Malik next training session. The boys also noticed Malik and paused to see if the gritty, no-nonsense man was going to do anything. All he did was return to his phone so the boys returned to their former aggressive stance. Although the boys had turned their backs on Malik and could no longer see him, Michael could see him all too well. Continue reading “Faith: Keep Going”