Purnima: Still Point

Here is the next part of Purnima (Book 7 of Waldmeer).

“At the still point of the turning world. Neither flesh nor fleshless;
Neither from nor towards; at the still point, there the dance is,” (T. S. Eliot)

Mr Peen’s Fire

Next full moon, Merlyn found herself not at Ajna Temple (the Manipura Dancers and Waldmeer Warriors collaboration had been postponed), nor at Purnima Passage. In fact, she wasn’t anywhere in Waldmeer. She was tossing and turning on Tom’s uncomfortable sofa bed in the city. It was Friday, and that meant adult ballet class, at the State Ballet, and then a visit to Tom & Hardy.

Continue reading “Purnima: Still Point”

The Sly Deceiver

This short story (written in 2016) is in my newly published book, Touched by Love (Book 2 of The Great Love Affair Series).

Man cannot really live without attachments, but mostly we are reaching for the wrong attachment. (Thomas Hora)

Isobel watched Benedict walk unsteadily down his driveway towards the builders in the backyard. He hadn’t dressed properly. He had no underwear on and his track pants were ripped so that anyone who looked (perhaps, it was impossible not to look) could see his backside. Somehow, it was still a great looking backside for all that he had put his body through in recent years. There was no point telling him that he hadn’t dressed properly. He was too sick. Along the way, things like dignity get lost.

Continue reading “The Sly Deceiver”

Purnima: Same-Song-Sung

Here is the next part of Purnima (Book 7 of Waldmeer).

Drunks and Bogans

Merlyn was the last one to leave the room after her weekly adult dance class at the State Ballet. She was in a quiet corner stretching and processing her recent visit to Gum Flat. 

“What’s the matter with him – mouthing off like an idiot?” said a teacher entering the room with a co-worker. 

Clearly, they hadn’t noticed Merlyn. She was about to make her presence known, but decided to shrink further into the shadows as they continued their conversation.

Continue reading “Purnima: Same-Song-Sung”

Purnima: Gum Flat

Here is the next part of Purnima (Book 7 of Waldmeer): Gum Flat.

Have you seen the bush by moonlight, from the train, go running by?
Blackened log and stump and sapling, ghostly trees all dead and dry;
Here a patch of glassy water; there a glimpse of mystic sky?
Have you heard the still voice calling — yet so warm, and yet so cold:
“I’m the Mother-Bush that bore you! Come to me when you are old”?

Did you see the Bush below you sweeping darkly to the Range,
All unchanged and all unchanging, yet so very old and strange!
While you thought in softened anger of the things that did estrange?
(Did you hear the Bush a‑calling, when your heart was young and bold:
“I’m the Mother-Bush that nursed you; come to me when you are old”?)

In the cutting or the tunnel, out of sight of stock or shed,
Did you hear the grey Bush calling from the pine-ridge overhead:
“You have seen the seas and cities — all is cold to you, or dead —
All seems done and all seems told, but the grey-light turns to gold!
I’m the Mother-Bush that loves you — come to me now you are old”?

(On The Night Train by Henry Lawson)

Night Train

On the way to Gum Flat:

Merlyn read the Henry Lawson poem which was on the wall of the night train to Gum Flat. Written in 1922, the year of Lawson’s passing, it was his last poem. She looked out the dark window at the even darker bush running by and felt a profound sense of belonging and also a profound sense of separation – Have you heard the still voice calling — yet so warm, and yet so cold. It was the same land that Lawson saw, wrote about, and loved. This land doesn’t really change. It is too vast, ancient, detached, motherly. All unchanged and all unchanging, yet so very old and strange.

Continue reading “Purnima: Gum Flat”

Purnima: Abandon

Here is the next part of Purnima (Book 7 of Waldmeer)

Urgent and Confidential

In Waldmeer:

It was late morning before there was enough sun, on this biting mid-June morning, for Merlyn to sit outside her small rented flat. She sat there doing nothing, thinking nothing, staring at the sea below. This spot was the only place, at her home, where she could see the sea. It was worth sitting in the cold – coat, beanie, scarf, gloves. Anyway, cold or not, being outside always seems to change our perspective. It changes things that can best do with a change. The wind dismantles the heaviness, the light reorients the mind, the greenness invigorates hope, and the entire majestic dynamic of nature reminds us of our insignificance and also of our absolute significance.

Eventually, Merlyn checked her emails and read one from Prana Community marked Urgent and Confidential.

Continue reading “Purnima: Abandon”

Purnima: Tom & Hardy

Ekadashi

In the city, at Tom & Hardy:

“You don’t want any food, today?” asked Tom. “Only coffee? Aren’t you hungry, boo?”

“No, not really,” said Merlyn as she leaned down to pat Tom’s little dog, Hardy. “Anyway, it’s Ekadashi.”

“E-Kardashian?” repeated Tom.

Merlyn laughed and said, “Ekadashi – the 11th day after full moon. Guru Gadubanud said that we should fast. Usually, I don’t deliberately fast but, some days, I’m not hungry so I don’t eat much.”

Continue reading “Purnima: Tom & Hardy”

Purnima: Purnima Passage

Here is the beginning of Purnima (Book 7 of Waldmeer)!

Seeing the Totality

A full moon evening, late in May, in Waldmeer:

Purnima means full moon. Full moons are auspicious occasions for new beginnings, and so we begin; again. Merlyn and Gabriel stood awkwardly at the entrance of Twenty Mile Track. Awkward because they barely knew each other, and this seemed too big an adventure for virtual strangers. Nevertheless, there they were, brought together by some unknown force. 

Continue reading “Purnima: Purnima Passage”

Prana: Community

Mixed Drinks

“Weak latte (no sugar). Hot chocolate,” yelled the Waldmeer barista. 

Merlyn grabbed her coffee and headed for the door. They put sugar in my coffee, she thought as she sipped it. Hang on, that’s not sweet coffee. It’s hot chocolate. The orders have been muddled. Oh, wellit tastes delicious. She then turned her thoughts to the recipient of her latte who would be missing their own order of hot chocolate. Looking around for a likely suspect, she easily spotted a woman, about her age, staring at her drink. Merlyn wondered what her reaction would be. The woman seemed to be weighing up the benefits of caffeine versus sugar and, like Merlyn, decided to go with the flow. Merlyn then realised that the mixed-drink-recipient was Esther, the psychologist.

Continue reading “Prana: Community”

Pittown: Moving On

Different and Better

Although there were nicer shops a suburb or two closer to the city, Merlyn made a point of shopping at the Pittown ones. It seemed to her disloyal not to use them. Besides, she found the people interesting. Not infrequently, someone walked past her and turned their head to give her a second look. They looked like they thought they knew her, but then decided that they didn’t. Sometimes, they looked at her quizzically as if they were thinking that she didn’t belong in Pittown.

Continue reading “Pittown: Moving On”

Pittown: The Sleeping Prophet

Benjamin

Although the Pittown cafe owner had misjudged Merlyn’s friend to be her husband, she actually did have a husband. An estranged husband, anyway. The estrangement was how she came to be living in Pittown. Merlyn and Benjamin had only been married for three years. It wasn’t long but, as it turned out, long enough. They had known each other for two years previous to getting married. Merlyn wasn’t a big fan of getting married but Benjamin had fallen in love with her and very much wanted the marriage to work. For her part, Merlyn both loved and was in love with Benjamin in return. However, unlike Benjamin, she knew that he was ill-prepared for the reality of a committed relationship. She also knew that love is the most powerful force in the universe, so she gave Benjamin and the marriage her best shot and put her faith in his love to get him through.

Continue reading “Pittown: The Sleeping Prophet”