Nanima: Existential Sticking Point

Here is the next part of Nanima.

Poisonous Path

The winter solstice was turning into a relatively cheery, bright day. Cold? Yes. Miserable? Not at all. Maliyan was enjoying the passing paddocks, stock, sky, and clouds as she drove to the nearest large country town, Thubbo. After doing her jobs, she decided to make use of the Chinese Massage Centre because Nanima didn’t have one. Of all the wonderful things the Chinese bring to Australia, their massage centres were top of Maliyan’s list—cheap, quick, and effective.

Continue reading “Nanima: Existential Sticking Point”

Nanima: Alter of Sacrifice

Here is the next part of Nanima.

Part 2: Spirits Without Bodies

Alter of Sacrifice

Chapter 23: Dibbil-Dibbil

“This is scary,” whispered Luna.

Maliyan laughed but had to agree.

“What if dibbil-dibbil comes out of the cave?” said Luna.

Dibbil-dibbil was an Aboriginal word for evil spirit. The indigenous people were never cave dwellers (probably because of dibbil-dibbil) but they did use them for male initiation ceremonies (also probably because of dibbil-dibbil).

“We’ll run,” said Maliyan.

Luna rolled his eyes. At least, Maliyan assumed that’s what he was doing, but it was too dark to tell. 

Continue reading “Nanima: Alter of Sacrifice”

Nanima: Discovery

Happy new year, 2022. May you make the most of this year. Here is the beginning of a new story to start the year!

This is not a white story, or a black one. It’s a Spirit story. Nanima

Chapter 1: Nanima

Nanima lay in a pretty-as-a-picture valley at the joining point of two living, breathing rivers. The small country town had an English name, but Nanima was its ancient-as-the-rivers Aboriginal one. 

When discovering it, English explorer, Oxley, said of Nanima, “It is beautifully picturesque.” 

Of course, he didn’t really discover it. Even before the local people knew it, the valley and rivers knew themselves. The idea of discovery and consequent possession is used by those with neither the intelligence nor sensitivity to see the value in lives other than their own. Anyway, the Aboriginal people had a different sense of ownership. There is no need to possess anything when there is access to everything. It is only when someone says that your mother belongs to them that there is a problem. For more than fifty thousand years, there wasn’t a problem. For the last two hundred, there was.

Continue reading “Nanima: Discovery”
%d bloggers like this: