Esther: E. G. Psychology

Understanding ourselves takes work and courage. Whether or not we choose to do it is up to us. Although, really, we don’t have a choice because, eventually, the pain will make it intolerable. It’s more a matter of how much pain we are willing to endure before we undergo the ‘pain’ of transformation. At least, the latter pain gets us somewhere.

Chapter 3: Introduction

It was Monday morning. As Ben walked through the glass doors of the State Ballet building, he came across one of the older professionals of the company, a friend of many years.

“Morning, Ben,” said the man. “How’s Store Creek going?”

“Morning,” said Ben. “Fine. I suppose.” 

Truth be told, two weekends had passed since Ben had seen Merlyn. More, he hadn’t even spoken to her. Nor had he messaged. Every day, if not many times a day, he checked his messages to see if she had messaged him. She hadn’t.

Seeing the look on Ben’s face, his friend said tentatively, “Look, buddy, I thought you were back together but if things aren’t going quite to plan, I have a suggestion.” He waited to see Ben’s reaction. As there was no obvious displeasure from Ben about a suggestion, he continued, “The missus and I have had our ups and downs over the years. I think most people think that we have been very fortunate with our marriage and we have been but, the thing is, everyone has their problems. God knows, we’ve had many.” 

Continue reading “Esther: E. G. Psychology”

Healing – A Sacred Path

This previously unpublished article is from The Love of Devotion.

Living Prayer

When I was in my early twenties, before my time with spiritual teacher, Dr Thomas Hora, I happily belonged to a Catholic Charismatic group. I lived in two of its communal houses and embraced community life with great enthusiasm. Such Pentecostal groups view the miraculous as common and healing as the reachable result of sincere and dedicated prayer. Faith was alive. Prayer was common. Dedication was the norm. All expected their lives to improve and whole-heartedly dedicated their days to God, in much the same way as many religious orders do. As there were so many young people drawn to the lively community, it was also fun and full of laughter. It was, indeed, a wonderful time. I felt very fortunate to find a religious group that was alive, vibrant, and flourishing. I was able to live like a member of a religious order while being a lay person. I would say that the short-coming of such groups is the vulnerability to fundamentalist thinking and its associated problems.

Continue reading “Healing – A Sacred Path”

Esther: Inspection

Here is the beginning of Esther (Book 2 of Waldmeer Series – 2nd Generation).

INSPECTION

Chapter 1: Better or Worse

After six months of living in Store Creek with the cold weather, it was good to finally arrive at spring’s doorstep. Merlyn wondered if that was why Ben had decided to visit today. He said it was a rental inspection. But that was just a joke. At least, Merlyn hoped it was a joke. Although it was two years since their separation, they had been married for three years. Nothing needed inspecting. Continue reading “Esther: Inspection”

Healing and Creating

Here is my meditation for healing and creating. Meditation is not some new-age mumbo-jumbo for ungrounded people. True meditation is intelligent, humble, and powerful. It means to become consciously alive and well – to heal our body, to clear our mind, and to free our spirit. In this way, we reduce (and often eliminate) our problems and we have the deep satisfaction of living in an ever-evolving, connected, and creative way.

The Winged Life

He who bends to himself a joy
Does the winged life destroy;
He who kisses the joy as it flies
Lives in Eternity’s sunrise.
William Blake

Some years ago, I studied the lives of three well-known dancers/couples who danced in the early to mid-twentieth century and were all students of Christian Science which, at that time, was a thriving and innovative worldwide phenomenon. Here are the resulting articles.


Ruth St. Denis

We should realize in a vivid and revolutionary sense that we are not in our bodies but our bodies are in us. Ruth St. Denis

When Ted Shawn first saw Ruth St. Denis perform in 1911, he was enthralled. He was nineteen; a student fresh from religious studies and a ballroom dancer. He looked at the famous, thirty-two-year-old dancer with adoration. She combined his two great loves; dance and spirituality. Little did he realize that three years later, he would see her again, she would employ him to perform ballroom dancing routines in her shows, and, within the year, they would be married. Continue reading “The Winged Life”

Simple Pleasures – Home

Here is a section from the original The Love of Devotion which has returned in my latest re-edit. It includes some family history.

Little Oakey

My grandfather, Michael John Pope, was a pioneer farmer in outback New South Wales, Australia. He built his small, four-room home, Little Oakey, from the creek-stones of the area. Behind the house was a wattle and daub (clay) kitchen and cellar. In that little home, with his wife Mary Jane, he raised five children in, what would be considered by today’s standards, primitive isolation. Continue reading “Simple Pleasures – Home”

Pittown: Out of the Pit

Here is the final part of Pittown (Book 5 of the Waldmeer Series).

Chapter 36: Barcodes of Life

In Store Creek

The winding country road between Store Creek and the highway was the best part of the two-hour drive to the city. Merlyn watched the morning light skip along the trees. The thin branch-shadows on the road looked like a long line of barcodes. The mysterious barcodes of life, thought Merlyn. She felt content because, after all, who could not be at peace on such a beautiful morning? She remembered an Edgar Cayce saying that Enid often quoted,

Happiness is your choice to make. How happy or how miserable do you want to be? Continue reading “Pittown: Out of the Pit”

Pittown (Book 5 of Waldmeer)

img_4413-1Pittown (Book 5 of Waldmeer) is now published. I have loved writing the series. When I started it, 4 years ago, I had never written fiction or had the inclination to do so. However, I have found that story-telling is a wonderful outlet for expressing all sorts of emotions and thoughts. I once listened to an author who said, “I feel sorry for people who don’t write because what do they do with all the stuff that happens to them?” In the end, I tell myself that if I come away from what I have written feeling encouraged then there is the possibility that others will too. It’s all about healing; every word of the 160,000 in the series. We are in this together; for better, for worse, for healing.

Continue reading “Pittown (Book 5 of Waldmeer)”

When Men Rule

In many dance forms, including ballroom dancing, men rule. They rule not because of some innate quality which makes them better rulers, but because of the principles of demand and supply. There are a lot more female dancers than male, and so a good male dancer is valuable. Simple economics. Nothing wrong with that, however, as one would expect, good male dancers can become egocentric and controlling in the same way that CEOs can. Also, as expected, women can become submissive add-ons or, alternatively, partnerless dancers incapable of starting/maintaining a long-term dance connection. Continue reading “When Men Rule”

Pittown: Crossing Lines and Drawing Circles

Here is the next part of Pittown (Book 5 of the Waldmeer Series).

Chapter 34: Crossing Lines

When Gabriel travelled from Waldmeer to the Borderfirma Lowlands, twenty years ago, he was ready to give his relationship with Faith-Amira his best. For the first few years, he was somewhat dependent because he didn’t know how to live in the interdimensional world on his own. Gradually, he became accustomed to it. He made friends and found opportunities to follow his own leanings; including the ones that weren’t particularly aligned with Faith’s. After all, he was a different person to her. He always had been. He always would be. Continue reading “Pittown: Crossing Lines and Drawing Circles”